Rhine Tower.

The Rheinturm - look-out, landmark, world record

Rhine Tower

Photo: Messe Düsseldorf
Author: Philipp Schiwek
Keywords: rhein tower

In Dusseldorf superlatives abound; fast cars, executive companies, finest brands. But the Rhine Tower, Rheinturm simply towers above everything. At 240.5 meters, not as high as the Television Tower in Berlin and not even half the size of the Eiffel Tower in Paris, it is the highest building of the capital and as a landmark decorates postcards, tourist guides and photos alike.

It affords an especially impressive panorama of Dusseldorf and the surrounding area. Whether the Harbour, Medienhafen including the Gehry Buildings, the Old Town, Altstadt, the Court Gardens, Hofgarten, the famous Kings Avenue, Königsallee or the river, you don’t lose sight of anything from the viewing platform. At 160 meters, one can enjoy great views to the Rhenish country, Rheinische Land and up to Cologne especially in good weather and above the viewing platform the Rheinturm houses a self-service restaurant and a more exclusive restaurant.

The tower holds two technical highlights. Rotating 360 degrees every hour, for technical reasons, it actually turns in one direction between 12 noon and 5.30 pm and from 6.30 pm to 1 am in the other. Another subtlety is a worldwide unique decimal timepiece that the Dusseldorf designer Horst H. Baumann developed which is located in the tower’s stem.

Separated into three sections, each with two sets of lights, the tower’s scuttles are populated with variously coloured light-emitting diodes. The lamps designating tens and single hours, minutes and seconds glow into the night sky and, although many people know that there is a clock in the tower, very few are actually able to tell you what time the LEDs show.

The original purpose should not be forgotten; the tower receives and sends thousands of signals for radio and television broadcasting and is managed by Deutsche Telekom, so, the Rheinturm is in fact a real all-rounder.

Rhine Tower - Time

Rhine Tower - Time.

Separated into three sections, each with two sets of lights, the tower’s scuttles are fitted with variously coloured light-emitting diodes. The lamps designating tens and single hours, minutes and seconds glow into the night sky....

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